Top 15 Topics Retired People Worry About

Our attitude towards retirement and ageing has changed dramatically over recent years. In many ways, today’s 55 is yesterday’s 35. Improved health, education, increased awareness and technology all play their part. Thankfully, the days when retirement was perceived as a gradual decline from productive life and a passive alienation from the rest of the world are long gone.

Many of us can look forward to a retirement of 25+ years or more – longer than any other stage in our life. Retirement planning is often interpreted as financial planning on the basis that finances are the most critical aspect of retirement. Other essential aspects are often overlooked. Consequently, the transition can be unnecessarily difficult and for some it may be an unwelcome prospect.

This series of blogs explores 15 of the most crucial aspects of retirement and raises some questions you may want to consider to navigate your own road to a successful retirement, whatever that may mean for you.

I have divided this information into 3 parts so today you are receiving part 1 which is topics 1-5.

I hope that it is useful for you.

1.  Getting a clear perspective of WHO you are, not WHAT you are

For most of us our job/career will have defined not only what we do but who we are.

It is helpful to change from asking ‘What am I?’ to ‘Who am I?’

– developing a deeper understanding of ourselves beyond our relationship with work.

  • How would you define your own personal worth?
  • Who do you wish to be after you have finished work?

2.    Reframing your atitude towards retirement

Is retirement about ‘having one foot in the grave’ or is it about ‘having new experiences’?

  • What are the ingredients for a successful retirement for you?
  • What changes, if any, do you need to make to your current perspective?
  • What are the life positives that you see in retirement?

3.   Taking responsibility for the retirement you want

We need to have our own sense of purpose to make plans and decisions in retirement rather than relying on others to supply direction. Even if we are self-motivated self-starters, we need to adopt a flexible attitude in order to manage and adapt to change.

  • Who is the boss in your work, home and social life?
  • Who controls your sense of self?
  • How decisive are you generally?

4.  Having a positive attitude to personal 'wellness'

When we think of ‘retiring from’ rather than ‘retiring to’ we set ourselves up for poor health. Our emotional well-being will certainly add to, or detract from, our physical well-being. We can all actively choose to make our lifestyle healthier.

  • What will you do to ensure you live your life to the full?
  • How will you improve your health? Diet? Alcohol? Tobacco? Exercise? Rest?
  • How can a healthier lifestyle become a way of life for you?

5.  Securing your financial resources

Retirement doesn’t have to mean an end to working altogether – a different approach to work can play a vital role in our new retirement and overcome financial concerns. A balance is needed between the ever-pressing nature of finances and the absolute need to engage in life-enriching activities that feed all 3 aspects of us – body, mind and spirit.

Consider talking to an independent financial adviser to check that your retirement income can support your vision of how you intend to live your retirement.

  • How do you define ‘financial security’?
  • What’s enough realistically? -Details

Our attitude towards retirement and ageing has changed dramatically over recent years. In many ways, today’s 55 is yesterday’s 35. Improved health, education, increased awareness and technology all play their part. Thankfully, the days when retirement was perceived as a gradual decline from productive life and a passive alienation from the rest of the world are long gone.

Many of us can look forward to a retirement of 25+ years or more – longer than any other stage in our life. Retirement planning is often interpreted as financial planning on the basis that finances are the most critical aspect of retirement. Other essential aspects are often overlooked. Consequently, the transition can be unnecessarily difficult and for some it may be an unwelcome prospect.

6.  Appreciating what you've got

Many people believe that ‘happiness is an inside job’. The trick is to look ahead with hope and have a positive attitude about ageing: be prepared to accept change, become sensitive to the needs of others, develop a purpose in life, find enriching and stimulating activities, keep focused on things that are important, listen to your inner self – all these will enhance your happiness factor.

  • What changes can you make to increase your overall life satisfaction?
  • What do you think will give you happiness in the future?
  • Who do you like to be around the most? Others? Yourself?

7.  Looking forward, expecting good things

Having a positive view of the future gives us hope and hope is the power that gives us confidence about tomorrow. It is a self-fulfilling prophecy that if we believe tomorrow will be good, then it probably will be as we will have set the stage for good things to happen. A vision is essential. Creating a list of must haves that include your 3-part self, (body, mind and spirit), will not only motivate and inspire you but will go a long way to ensuring a happy and fulfilling life-style.

  • Who is in charge of your tomorrow?
  • How will you manage friendships in the future? Will you keep the same friends as you have today?
  • Do you think your retirement years will be a continuation of your life right now or will there be changes? If so, what will they be.

8.  Finding purpose and fulfilment in retirement

We need life meaning (a sense of worth) in the same way that we need food, water and air. Our health depends on our life meaning. Having a personal dream gives rise to well-being, a sense of direction and fulfilment.

  • What would you say is your overall life purpose right now? In the future?
  • How aligned are you with your values?
  • How will you generate personal meaning in your retirement years?

9. Relaxing and enjoying yourself

In retirement, leisure commands a more central position than previously. However, it needs its place in the hierarchy of our retirement living.

By the same token, if we allow our life become a life of leisure ONLY, following the same leisurely pursuits day in, day out, week in, week out, it loses its ability to refresh us and creates an unhealthy imbalance in our everyday life.

  • What does your leisure life include now?
  • What do you do to stimulate your mind?
  • What leisure interests have you had in the past that you would like to renew in retirement?

10.  Adapting to inevitable change

Developing an attitude that allows us to become more accepting rather than critical, more agreeable rather than argumentative, more forgiving rather than judging and more at peace with ourselves and the world rather than angry, will ensure that our retirement becomes a time, a place and a lifestyle which offers contentment and opportunities.

  • How easily can you accept change into your life?
  • Do you anticipate more or less change in your life in retirement?
  • In what area of your life are you most and least adaptable?

Our attitude towards retirement and ageing has changed dramatically over recent years. In many ways, today’s 55 is yesterday’s 35. Improved health, education, increased awareness and technology all play their part. Thankfully, the days when retirement was perceived as a gradual decline from productive life and a passive alienation from the rest of the world are long gone.

Many of us can look forward to a retirement of 25+ years or more – longer than any other stage in our life. Retirement planning is often interpreted as financial planning on the basis that finances are the most critical aspect of retirement. Other essential aspects are often overlooked. Consequently, the transition can be unnecessarily difficult and for some it may be an unwelcome prospect.

11.  Living in the present, not the past

If we believe that our yesterdays were somehow better, happier, more productive or greater fun, then we begin to extinguish our light and its becomes harder to make the positive changes necessary to enter a new life stage with confidence.

Our retirement transition can provide the forum for personal renewal like no other stage in our life.

  • Are you past-orientated or future-orientated?
  • How much of your thinking is in the now?
  • What changes do you need to make to make sure that you make the most of each day, each week, and each month from now on?

12. Finding the right balance towards care giving

The transition into one’s retirement lifestyle can become difficult when the strain of caring for elders or other family members becomes overwhelming. It is important to have a clear sense of boundaries, limits in the amount, intensity and breadth of care giving you are capable of giving – as well as boundaries for the ageing parent, adult child or other party for whom care is given.

  • Do you anticipate any care-giving responsibilities coming in retirement?
  • How hard or easy is care giving for you and your spouse?
  • What boundaries need to be in place around care giving?

13.  Developing a strong partnership at home

A healthy relationship makes for a healthy retirement; An OK relationship makes for an OK retirement, while a chronically sick relationship makes for a disastrous retirement!

  • What could make your relationship a happier one?
  • Do you anticipate any changes in your marriage during retirement?
  • Are you both ‘in sync’ with your retirement planning?

14.  Staying young, whatever your age

Why is it that some 45-year-olds seem ancient while others, in their 80s and beyond, reflect a joie de vivre, a lightness and brightness we associate only with youth? It’s all about ATTITUDE!

Here are a few tips to enhance a youthful attitude:

  1. Think of your retirement as a new journey of discovery, not the end of an era.
  2. Resolve old conflicts and grudges – internal bitterness poisons our well-being.
  3. Offer something of yourself to others – research shows that those who help others are significantly happier than those who don’t.
  4. Develop a grateful heart – be thankful for the gifts you have.
  5. Laugh at yourself! Humour boosts the immune system!
  6. Continue to learn new things; stimulate your mind.
  • How ‘youthful’ do you want to be? What’s the first step you can take to make that happen?
  • Who would you have as your major role model in terms of ageing?
  • How does your view of ageing differ from the common view of ageing?

15.  Bringing the benefits of work/career into the retirement

Generally, our work provides us with five benefits, which give us an overall level of satisfaction:

  1. Financial compensation:this we need if we are to meet our material needs in retirement.
  2. Time management:our work gives our life structure and order; it manages our time; we are in sync with what’s going on around us.
  3. A sense of purpose:we feel a sense of contribution; we know we are useful; we bring value. Having a sense of purpose injects meaning into our life, none more so than when we have ‘retired’ from our place of work.
  4. Status:it is from our work, our role in society that we acquire a certain status. We have a definite place in the scheme of things. Status is that combined sense of personal worth and identity we derive from knowing who and what we are.
  5. Socialisation:our work allows us to interact with others, develop relationships, and form friendships. We are always connected with something.

I hope that these points have helped clarify and resolve some of your worries around retirement and therefore allow you to celebrate retirement!

I would love to hear if you have any comments.

Gill Mathias (Guest Blogger)

topics retired people worry about

About Gill Mathias

After many years living overseas in Africa, we arrived back in the UK where I bought a gym and beauty salon in 1983, built it up and sold on in 1988. I then started an aromatherapy company and at the same time was a director and ultimately managing director of a property company. I did not want to “retire”, so with all my business experience, I retrained as a Business Coach, but with a specialism in Stress Management, as this is the “Disease of the 21st Century”. 

Gill is now the leading independent expert on pre-retirement planning.
www.gillmathias.com
info@gillmathias.com

Book your chemistry call with Gill here

FREE Retirement Planning Checklist

Plan For a Retirement Filled With Independence, Joy And Freedom

0 Shares

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *